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File #: 17-730    Version: 1 Name:
Type: Agendas Status: Passed
File created: 11/28/2018 In control: Board of Aldermen
On agenda: 2/5/2019 Final action: 2/5/2019
Title: Truth Plaque Task Force Presentation PURPOSE: The purpose of this item is for members of the Truth Plaque Task Force to present their recommendation to the Board of Aldermen.
TITLE: Title
Truth Plaque Task Force Presentation

PURPOSE: The purpose of this item is for members of the Truth Plaque Task Force to present their recommendation to the Board of Aldermen.
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DEPARTMENT: Town Clerk

CONTACT INFORMATION: Cathy Dorando, 919-918-7309

INFORMATION: On May 1, 2018 the Board of Aldermen directed staff to work with the community to gather input for the possible installation of a "truth plaque" that will detail the ugly truth of the racist history of Julian Carr, the Town's namesake.
The Truth Plaque Task Force was comprised of Alderman Gist and the following citizen members:
First Name
Last Name
Mae
McLendon
Braxton
Foushee
Terri
Buckner
Gary
Phillips
Jonathan
Gerard
Richard
Ellington
Lynn
Steinberg
Jake
Thorne
Nicholas
Graham
Rani
Dasi
Lillie
Atwater
Lewis
Atwater
Delores
Clark
Charles
Alston
Nate
Davis

The Task Force met in 2018 on September 5th, October 10th, October 30th, and November 13th, and again on January 22, 2019.
At the January 22, 2019 meeting of the Carrboro Truth Plaque committee, they agreed upon the following wording for the plaque:

Carrboro's roots began in the late 19th century when a branch of the North Carolina Railroad extended south to the edge of Chapel Hill, and the first local textile mill opened nearby. Informally known as West End and Lloydville, the community incorporated as a town named Venable in 1911.

Two years later, the state legislature renamed the town Carrboro at the request of Julian S. Carr, a post-Civil War business leader. He was also an active and influential participant in Jim Crow era efforts to create a system of racial segregation. Although the town continues to bear his name, the values and actions of Carr do not represent Carrboro today.

In the 1970s a group of Carrboro residents joined together to change the town's power structure and advocate for a community that fully included all residents. Thanks to their commitment, today Ca...

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